Capturing Relationships

I spent an evening at Juhu Beach, Mumbai – just me and my camera. Unlike the silent beaches back home where I sit and watch the waves for hours together, Juhu was bustling with people – tourists, hawkers, and locals. The beach was extremely littered and dirty. People were everywhere taking pictures and playing in the beach. The sunset was beautiful and the colour on the water and on people’s face turned orange and for a minute, I could hear only the waves. A moment in my own world.

Then I looked around and saw hundreds of people, each in their own world with their loved ones. The relationship between them and the beach was wonderful. I chose my subjects and captured the happiness, bonding and each of their lives in frames.

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Through rough tide and low tide…

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Thank you for holding me… Thank you for letting go… you are the bravest hero daddy…

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I am right here.. right beside you.. and we’ll take the waves together little girl…

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Immersed in the sea of thoughts… soaked in your love…

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Let’s take a stroll and grow up together…

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Let me dream with you…let me into your little big world…

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I can give life, I can destroy… I can be calm, I can be fierce…

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Ready? Catch the waves and pocket them son!

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Solitude… Serendipity… The Sea…

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This is where I begin… This is where I end… This is where I grow… Play with me while I am at the shore…

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sathiya Kavignan – Velliangattan

When someone asks me why I want to be a writer, I know it is my life’s calling. But what could have made me tell I wanted to be a writer when I was barely ten years old? Unless it ran in my blood, how did I hold on to my dream – a dream that I dreamed as a child?

I am always proud and equally humbled down when I call myself the great grand daughter of a poet. He lived from 1904 – 1991. His  name, Velliangattan ( it is his pen name, he named himself after his village). My father often says that he gets worried thinking if I took, more than my flair for writing, after him. The poet’s ideals were pretty much of a nonconformist’s.

I have already posted my article on him that appeared in The Hindu, Coimbatore (Metroplus) – follow the link to find the article.

http://www.thehindu.com/features/metroplus/society/hidden-histories-a-poet-rediscovered/article6686235.ece

This post is to present the documentary on my great grandfather, I directed. It was a pleasure working with my team who showed keen interest in the work despite very pressing project deadlines. I have to thank my team, also my classmates Navaneeth, Amir, Shiyam, Anusha and Nikitha for their support. Co-ordinating the crew throughout the project, writing the script for the documentary and working on the screenplay which is very vital to the success of a documentary has given me a level of satisfaction in  calling myself his grand daughter. I am happy I finally brought it out.

I have to thank  my grandmom. The great poet would be no where if not for her. The documentary is not only an account of my great grandfather’s life as a poet and the journey of his writings, but also a record of the inspiring effort of this old woman who has stood up to her cause defying age and education as a barrier.

I thank the writers and literary legends of Coimbatore who welcomed my efforts and gave me appointment to record their interviews. I thank Puviyarasu sir, Nanjil Nadan sir, Marabin Maindhan Muthaya sir, Senthalai Gowthaman sir, C.R.Elangovan sir for their precious time.

I named the documentary Sathiya Kavignan (poet of truth) because the poet lived by the truth he wrote.

Do watch the documentary and give your feedback. I humbly ask you to share the link because we want to rediscover this great poet of Coimbatore. The film is rather a small  tribute compared to the quality of his life.

Language: Full Length Tamil Documentary

Running time: 12 minutes

Ask the right questions

Dasara Greetings to all!

We celebrated Ayudha pooja and Vijaya Dasami during the past two days. Celebrating Ayudha Pooja has always reminded me that some traditions are good to be kept as they reiterate some very important values in human life. Of course, like any other festival this too has mythical references – Goddess Shakthi executing Mahisasura and Ayudha pooja was the day when her weapons were laid for worship. Many many version to the stories exist.  Myths apart,  our festivals have a purpose.

Ayudha pooja – means worship of tools. Tools that help our profession, books that enrich our knowledge are kept at par with God and worshiped on this auspicious day. They are cleaned, decorated and worshiped. Even vehicles are washed and decorated with flowers.

Traditions such as these have reminded us to love and respect the things that help us grow. We attach divine values to non-living tools. Such values can take a man higher.

Every festival in India, immaterial of which religion it represents holds hidden values in stories told or ceremonies performed. Some have explicit social values. Like, how much ever far we go into change and modernity, on festive occasions we wear clothes of our region, chant mantras and eat food that belongs to our soil. We identify ourselves with history and ancestry. Also, all festivals bring together the family. They open the gates to quality time and relaxation from the fast-paced daily routine.

At the same time, I have personally taken to condemn certain traditions, such as the ceremonies done to a girl who has just attained puberty. Who can see sense in announcing a girl’s coming of age to the public. I have felt that I shall never allow such traditions to pass on in my family.

Sometimes, if we study with care, we can notice that some tradition existed for many other reasons and they are definitely not the reasons we perceive them to happen for.  We do not know to ask the right questions, but we often know to infer wrong answers!

I must cite Anita Desai here! She has given a beautiful introduction write-up to Attia Hosain’s ‘Sunlight on a broken Column’ novel.  She says that in India the past lingers on and never disappears. One form of it is traditions and customs that are followed without a question. We don’t know why we do it, but we do it.

Killing the tradition is no nobility. Living with customs that kill rational reasoning is no virtue. Let’s learn to question. Let’s learn to infer the answers right!

Introduction to Attia Hosain’s ‘Sunlight on a broken Column’ novel by ANITA DESAI… First few lines ..

In India, the past never disappears. It does not even become transformed into a ghost. Concrete, physical, palpable – it is present everywhere. Ruins, monuments, litter the streets, hold up the traffic, create strange islands in the modernity of the cities. No one fears or avoids them – goats and cows graze around them, the poor string up ropes and rags and turn them into dwellings, election campaigners and cinema distributors plaster them with pamphlets – and so they remain a part of the here and now, of today.

In other ways, too, the past clings. As sticky as glue, or syrup. Traditions. Customs. “Why do you paint a tika on your baby’s forehead?” “Why do you fall at your father’s feet and touch your forehead to the ground?” “Why does a woman fast on this particular day?” “Why bathe in the river during an eclipse?” “Why does the bridegroom arrive on a horse, bearing a sword?” It is the custom, the tradition. No further explanation is required than this – it has always been so, it must continue to be so.

If there is a break in that tradition, then – “what will happen?” Things too terrible to be named. The downfall of the family, the society, of religion, of the motherland, India herself.

So a woman will paint a tika on her baby’s forehead, a young man touch an elder’s feet, a marriage need to be approved not only by parents but an astrologer as well… and so life is lived according to its rules, rules prescribed by time, centuries of time.

Of course time moves in other directions as well – TV and radio sets invade homes, the sari is given up for jeans, the old astrologer laughed at and the priest avoided, the past scorned. But it remains. Like the colour of one’s skin, and eyes, it remains. It does not leave.

Attia Hosain’s novel and collection of short stories are monuments to that past: the history of north India, before Partition. …..

These shots are just some random clicks that I took yesterday at my house pooja room.

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Scenes from Pooja at home!

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Offering to God on Ayudhapooja

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Anna Lakshmi sits on rice with Komaadha (Cow god) behind – Scenes from Pooja hall

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Lakshmi from a Kerala traditional brass lamp

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Baby Lord Krishna

Palamalai – nourishment to one’s body and soul

India is known for its hill top temples and devotees who climb these hills by foot to worship their God. My grandmother would say that the lord has to be above all and so temples were built on hills. My mother would thoughtfully say that it was intended to combine physical fitness and health with worship, so that self discipline is emphasized parallel to divinity. However my brother would argue that temples those days were used to accommodate citizens during war and floods , so they were built on hill tops for protection. I have no idea why many temples sit at the tip of a mountain, but I know that one can find his God in its true sense in the journey when you climb a mountain by foot.

Though not a profound believer (Euphemistically)  of religion or theism, hilltop temples have always been my favourite destination for many reasons. This is an account of my experiences while climbing Palamalai. I would say that the hill and the Ranganathar (Lord Vishnu) shrine that crowns it is one among the natural treasures of Coimbatore, a beautiful city of Tamil Nadu in South India. My uncle used to take us there as children. He climbs the hill every Sunday to shed some sweat and to nourish his spiritual faith. I loved tagging along with him often in the company of cousins. It was more like a picnic and a stride out of school routine. Nevertheless, it is more than just a picnic if you pay attention to your surroundings and trek up, taking pauses and detours when your instinct asks you to.

The hill is situated on the road from Periyanayakanpalayam enroute to Govanur. It is a good drive and if you sit back and enjoy your drive you will probably miss the right cut-road and go on to climb the hill by your vehicle. So ask for directions from anyone around there (Anna GPS!!!) or ask your google map for “Palamalai foothills bus stop” and it will direct you to the starting point of the trekking path.

It is a three kilometer trek if I am right (I am not so sure!!). But forget the distance, do not ask anyone on the trekking path, “How much distance more to the temple ?” because it spoils the fun and tests your perseverance. When we kept asking that to my uncle he would just say, “we are almost there” from the beginning to the end.

In the beginning of the climb there is a small God under thatched roof whom you worship before you set your journey up to the Ranganathar.  For first time or rare trekkers, the climb would be absolutely exhausting, tiring, your mind would be so convinced to give up. Despite my advice, you would ask someone there, “How much more should we go?” ten minutes into the journey. Yet, it will turn out to be a very exhilarating experience that you would recount to many in time to come. I am confidently throwing these to you, in my own experience of taking friends and family there on random weekends.

It is neither a full-fledged trek, nor a simple hike. The path has steps and steep climbs and uneven tracks in the middle of a forest. It would be quite a lonely and scary path on weekdays whereas many habitually climb the hill on weekends at early morning. We start climbing by 06.15 am (maximum) so that we can go up before it gets too sunny and no one would want to miss witnessing the sunrise from half way up. Lot of cacti and thousands of trees constitute the forest. There also steep cliffs  a few feet away from the main path. Once, we took a side route at the beginning itself,and spotted a herd of deer grazing the plains (I was too lame and too late to pull out my camera as a friend called out to another friend chasing them all away in a glimpse!). Many animals, especially elephants are often seen there by locals. A silent climb will treat you to the chirping and singing of hundred of birds and insects. Well, I guess I have not told you yet! Palamalai is a promising stop for Ornithology enthusiasts and such people have camped there before with zoom lens to spot the winged buddies.

We always wear tracks and Tees with proper shoes without which your feet will fall prey to the stones and thorns strewn all over the journey.  But there are devotees who climb on bare feet and there are athletes who run up the mountain building their stamina. The hill also houses local tribe who own livestock and do farming.

We took a couple of daring detours that took us to down to a beautiful water log. Poops of deers, elephants and even carnivores can easily be spotted there. When we spotted fresh poop of a deer, we had goosebumps and the very fact that a predator also could be around, sent shivers up our spine and we ran back to the main path after we heard something jump and run amidst the forest. So honestly, it is not all that safe to take long detours on your own.

A small whitewashed empty building and a stone bench signifies that you have covered the major part of the journey. It is called the thaneer pandhal (they used to give water to the trekkers from that building in olden days). Eyes start searching for the tall white Gopuram of the temple from there. From that point it is ten minutes to reach the hill top! A very frustrating thing about the whole journey are the number of plastic bags and covers that lie scattered on the path. Whenever we climb up I make sure I pick up as many plastic as I could and carry it up to dump it with other trash. But two pair of feeble hands cannot clean the irresponsibility of so many so called devotees to God.

When you reach; when you hear the temple bells ringing or the bajans being chanted; best of all, when you smell steaming raagi vadai, potato bonda and sukku kaapi  in the air – God manifests in your heart. All the fatigue is swept away in the fresh breeze and whatever tiredness is left of it is washed away when you drench your feet and wash your face in the temple water. I love the temple there for its cold stone floor, the chandan slab where we can grind chandhan and apply, the Poovarasan tree that mightily stands as the thalai vriksham (holy tree of the temple) and the beautifully decorated statues.

If you choose to climb on a Saturday a ready annadhanam (free food) and resounding bajan will welcome you and never miss the ragi vada and sukku kaapi that a paati cooks outside the temple. We devour the delicacies and feed the calfs and pups there filling our stomachs and hearts mutually. I can never forget a balck – brown calf who would not leave my side wherever I go. She kept nudging me with her face for more bananas even after I gave her half a dozen.

Here comes, yet another elating part of the temple. About a kilometer from the main shrine, they have the theppa kulam, temple pond. The walk to the pond is very beautiful as the path has yellow flowering trees lined on both sides and as you reach, a humongous banyan tree spreads its branches across creating lot of shade. I always visit there for two reasons. One is to climb on the branches of the magnificent tree. She is indeed an old woman but she grew in strength and lets you walk on her arms and sit by her breasts. She has no bias and her generosity knows no end. The other reason, is to go down the steps to the waters and immerse my feet in it. A thousand odd fish swims to your feet and nibble away. A free and efficient fish pedicure? Nay, its a million kisses for pure joy!

If you are a native to Coimbatore like I am, or if you ever visit the city, never miss this natural and spiritual bounty. Forget your religion, beliefs and ideals because at the end of the day you cannot miss a beautiful experience for nothing. This may not be Mount Everest, but it teaches you the first lessons of perseverance.


Footnotes:

*Anna GPS – In Tamil , Anna means brother. When we call men on the road to ask for directions where GPS does not work or has no clue, we call it Anna GPS. It is just a slang amidst youngsters here.

*Gopuram – Monumental tower which is above the temple.

*Thaneer pandhal – A place where people give water or buttermilk to the travelers when they come to rest there mid-way of their journey.

* Bajans – Spiritual songs

* Raagi Vadai – A snack made out of red millets

*Bonda – A snack

*Sukku Kaapi – Dry Ginger Coffee

*Chandhan – Sandal wood  paste

*Poovarasan tree – A particular variety of peepal tree. Its fruits are said to cure skin problems.

*Thalai Vriksham – Holy tree of the temple

* Annadhaanam – free food served for devotees and the poor who visit the temple

*Paati – Grandmother/ old woman

*Theppa kulam – Holy pond of the temple

 

The photo ride begins!

 

The trekking path !

The trekking path – walk with the soul of earth

 Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/400 seconds // F-stop : f/5.6 // ISO : 200 // Focal Length: 135 mm // Flash : No

 

A lonely dry tree on the path...

A lonely dry tree on the path…

 Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/400 seconds // F-stop : f/4 // ISO : 100 // Focal Length: 18 mm // Flash : No

 

A single orange tree contrasting amidst all the green with tiny birds dancing on her branches ! We found her on a very small detour

A single orange tree contrasting amidst all the green with tiny birds dancing on her branches ! We found her on a very small detour

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/200 seconds // F-stop : f/5.6 // ISO : 100 // Focal Length: 100 mm // Flash : No

 

A lonely house on a mountain top - a view from the main trekking path

A lonely house on a mountain top – a view from the main trekking path

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/400 seconds // F-stop : f/5.6 // ISO : 100 // Focal Length: 135 mm // Flash : No

 

An early morning view from the edge of the path where there is a cliff fall

An early morning view from the edge of the path where there is a cliff fall

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens) // Exposure time : 1/3200 seconds // F-stop : f/4 // ISO : 100 // Focal Length: 18 mm // Flash : No

 

A little long and daring detour into the forest took us to these water logs..

A little long and daring detour into the forest took us to these water logs…

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/125 seconds // F-stop : f/4 // ISO : 100 // Focal Length: 21 mm // Flash : No

 

The Ranganathar temple

The Ranganathar temple – an outer view

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/1000 seconds // F-stop : f/4 // ISO : 100 // Focal Length: 21 mm // Flash : No

 

The temple cart  (Kovil thaer), it is dragged by devotees on special occasions)

The temple cart (Kovil thaer), it is dragged by devotees on special occasions)

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/125 seconds // F-stop : f/4.5 // ISO : 200 // Focal Length: 31 mm // Flash : No

 

The Bajan Mandapam

The Bajan Mandapam

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/640 seconds // F-stop : f/4 // ISO : 100 // Focal Length: 21 mm // Flash : No

 

Paati and the steaming sukku kaapi!

Paati and the steaming sukku kaapi!

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/60 seconds // F-stop : f/4 // ISO : 200 // Focal Length: 24 mm // Flash : No

 

Hot and delicious bondas!!

Hot and delicious bondas!!

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/125 seconds // F-stop : f/5.6 // ISO : 200 // Focal Length: 135 mm // Flash : No

 

Annadhaana Koodam (free food hall)

Annadhaana Koodam (free food hall)

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/400 seconds // F-stop : f/4 // ISO : 100 // Focal Length: 18 mm // Flash : No

 

Festive colours at the temple grounds.. An intentional blur of the shrine

Festive colours at the temple grounds.. An intentional blur of the shrine

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/1250 seconds // F-stop : f/5 // ISO : 100 // Focal Length: 42 mm // Flash : No

 

A temple priest

A temple priest

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/200 seconds // F-stop : f/5.6 // ISO : 200 // Focal Length: 24 mm // Flash : No

 

The path to theppa kulam (temple pond)

The path to theppa kulam (temple pond)

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/160 seconds // F-stop : f/4 // ISO : 100 // Focal Length: 18 mm // Flash : No

 

A beautiful cactus bloom on the hill

A beautiful cactus bloom on the hill

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/250 seconds // F-stop : f/4.5 // ISO : 100 // Focal Length: 36 mm // Flash : No

 

The mighty old banyan tree near the temple pond - spreading her arms of generosity!

The mighty old banyan tree near the temple pond – spreading her arms of generosity!

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/125 seconds // F-stop : f/4 // ISO : 100 // Focal Length: 21 mm // Flash : No

 

The temple pond - theppa kulam

The temple pond – theppa kulam

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/200 seconds // F-stop : f/7.1 // ISO : 100 // Focal Length: 38 mm // Flash : No

 

An old unused madapam beside the temple pond

An old unused mandapam beside the temple pond

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/200 seconds // F-stop : f/4 // ISO : 200 // Focal Length: 24 mm // Flash : No

 

Fish kisses!

Fish kisses!

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/40 seconds // F-stop : f/7.1 // ISO : 100 // Focal Length: 87 mm // Flash : No

 

A goat quenching his thirst at the pond

A goat quenching his thirst at the pond

Camera : Canon 600 D (18-135mm lens)// Exposure time : 1/250 seconds // F-stop : f/5.6 // ISO : 100 // Focal Length: 135 mm // Flash : No

From the porch on a raining eve

Winds touching the earth with wet kisses
Listen to the eternal voice of the sky
Pouring down all the love… all the lust there is
Forcing all unromantic men under blinding roofs
It makes me wonder
What in this world can rain not heal !

 

Some frozen moments from my porch

 

 

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Reaching out to the sky … holding its love…

 

 

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So much lust …

 

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So much love …

 

 

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The last few kisses

 

The one who gets to enjoy all the rain...

The one who gets to drip with love…

 

 

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It sails across time and brings back the little one for you

 

 

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And this completes a perfect rainy evening … Hot tomato soup garnished with pepper and mint !

 

Five days in Singapore

The year 2015 began with  a family vacation to Singapore for me. It was indeed a great start. With my new camera hanging by my neck, it was where my first amateur photography attempts began. The country showed me what discipline and sense of duty can make of a place. The lush green lawns that ran alongside clean well maintained wide roads made me gaze endlessly. The elders who came with me constantly complained and mocked our country roads like they had no shame in being part of the population that made India what it is. Most tourist attractions held shows that carried a strong message on conservation of wildlife.

The laser show featured a story of time travelling called the Wings of time. It got us at the edge of the seat for it was a mind boggling experience. The animal show and the bird shows put a smile on our faces. What has to be mentioned for sure is the Light show in Gardens by the bay. The pillars of vertical gardens changed colours to music. Lights danced for the tune. A perfect treat for eyes and ears, it was such a soothing experience to lie on the stone floor and watch the gardens and the sky. Tall buildings, beautiful places, activity filled streets and awesome shows held us caught in admiration. But what touched me deep was how safe and free I felt there as a woman.

My father who would be mad at me if I am not home by dusk fall back in India, let me wander the streets of Little India in Singapore with my cousin until midnight. He sent us off alone in an unknown country to find our way to the Universal Studios and didn’t make a single call to find out if we were safe. We were allowed to dress in shorts and feel at ease. There was no conscious pressure about being a woman in that foreign land that welcomed us as tourists and made sure we experienced the best of hospitality. I wondered if the people, culture and the laws of Singapore made better brothers and sisters for us than that of India. When I asked for the way out of a building, people walked with us to where we had to go with a never-fading smile (like I obliged them by asking for help). I made friends with a Korean History teacher in a queue to buy burger at the Night Safari. She told me about Singapore’s first President, Yusof bin Ishak whose face I saw on the currency notes I was about to pay at the counter. She wished me good luck on my aspirations to become a writer. The day next, I spoke to a transgender friend from Philippines who was on a holiday. She loves to travel alone and in an hour-long queue to the Jurassic park ride in the Universal Studios, we shared water and lot of stories that we carried from home while discussing on gender issues across the world.

There was so much life all over the . Romantic honeymoon couples, many families from India (it was the “world-is-so-small” moment when we met a family we knew from our hometown in the hotel), school children on educational tours, we saw every kind of people in that small country that buzzes busy catering to tourists 24*7. It felt sad to be at the departure gates to fly back to daily routine just as it felt happy to be at the arrival gate and murmur “home sweet home”.

A few worthy ones from my endless clicking…

 

Vertical Garden directing us to the Arrival gates in Singapore Changi Airport

Vertical Garden directing us to the Arrival gates in Singapore Changi Airport

 

Place : Changi Airport, Singapore // Date : 14 January 2015 // Time of the day : Noon // Camera : Canon 600 D // Exposure time : 1/30 seconds // F-stop : f/3.5 // ISO : 320 // Focal Length: 18 mm // Flash : No

 

Fire show at the Night Safari

Fire show at the Night Safari

 

Place : Night Safari, Singapore // Date : 14 January 2015 // Time of the day : Night // Camera : Canon 600 D // Exposure time : 1/50 seconds // F-stop : f/7.1 // ISO : 6400 // Focal Length: 57 mm // Flash : No

 

 

White wolf at the Animal Show in Night Safari

White wolf at the Animal Show in Night Safari

 

Place : Night Safari, Singapore // Date : 14 January 2015 // Time of the day : Night // Camera : Canon 600 D // Exposure time : 1/60 seconds // F-stop : f/5.6 // ISO : 6400 // Focal Length: 135 mm // Flash : No

 

The famous Merlion. The symbol of singapore

The famous Merlion. The symbol of singapore

Place : Merlion, Singapore // Date : 15 January 2015 // Time of the day : Late morning // Camera : Canon 600 D // Exposure time : 1/200 seconds // F-stop : f/9 // ISO : 100 // Focal Length: 18 mm // Flash : No

 

Flyer ... 165 metres tall..

Flyer … 165 meters tall..

 

Place : Singapore // Date : 15 January 2015 // Time of the day : Late morning // Camera : Canon 600 D // Exposure time : 1/100 seconds // F-stop : f/20 // ISO : 400 // Focal Length: 53 mm // Flash : No

A view of the see from the flyer...

A view of the sea from the flyer…

 

Place : Singapore // Date : 15 January 2015 // Time of the day : Noon // Camera : Canon 600 D // Exposure time : 1/800 seconds // F-stop : f/5.6 // ISO : 100 // Focal Length: 92 mm // Flash : No

Prayer Lamps in a Chinese Temple

Prayer Lamps in a Chinese Temple

 

Place : Chinese Temple, Singapore // Date : 15 January 2015 // Time of the day : Noon // Camera : Canon 600 D // Exposure time : 1/50 seconds // F-stop : f/3.5 // ISO : 400 // Focal Length: 20 mm // Flash : No

 

Some colours are named after the bearer of the shade... Peacock

Some colours are named after the bearer of the shade… Peacock

 

Place :  Sentosa, Singapore // Date : 15 January 2015 // Time of the day : Noon // Camera : Canon 600 D // Exposure time : 1/125 seconds // F-stop : f/5.6// ISO : 400 // Focal Length: 100 mm // Flash : No

 

Jelly fish from Under Water World, Sentosa

Jelly fish from Under Water World, Sentosa

 

Place : Under Water World, Sentosa, Singapore // Date : 15 January 2015 // Time of the day : Noon // Camera : Canon 600 D // Exposure time : 1/50 seconds // F-stop : f/4.5 // ISO : 640 // Focal Length: 33 mm // Flash : No

Jelly Fish from Under water World, Sentosa

Jelly Fish from Under water World, Sentosa

 

Place : Under Water World, Sentosa, Singapore // Date : 15 January 2015 // Time of the day : Noon // Camera : Canon 600 D // Exposure time : 1/80 seconds // F-stop : f/5 // ISO : 800 // Focal Length: 25 mm // Flash : No

Dolphin show

Dolphin show

 

Place : Under Water World, Sentosa, Singapore // Date : 15 January 2015 // Time of the day : Evening // Camera : Canon 600 D // Exposure time : 1/1250 seconds // F-stop : f/5.6 // ISO : 800 // Focal Length: 100 mm // Flash : No

 

Laser show

Laser show – Wings of Time

 

Place : Sentosa, Singapore // Date : 15 January 2015 // Time of the day : Night// Camera : Canon 600 D // Exposure time : 1/80 seconds // F-stop : f/5 // ISO : 6400 // Focal Length: 20 mm // Flash : No

 

At the bird show, Jurong Bird Park

At the bird show, Jurong Bird Park

 

Place :  Jurong Bird Park, Singapore // Date : 16 January 2015 // Time of the day : Late morning // Camera : Canon 600 D // Exposure time : 1/400 seconds // F-stop : f/8 // ISO : 1600 // Focal Length: 135 mm // Flash : No

Flamingos, Jurong Bird Park

Flamingos, Jurong Bird Park

 

Place :  Jurong Bird Park, Singapore // Date : 16 January 2015 // Time of the day : Noon // Camera : Canon 600 D // Exposure time : 1/250 seconds // F-stop : f/5.6 // ISO : 250 // Focal Length: 135 mm // Flash : No

Snowy Owl, The shriek I gave calling out to the bird -- Hedwig !!! #pottermania. (It's so hard to grow up :P)

Snowy Owl, The shriek I gave calling out to the bird — Hedwig !!! #pottermania. (It’s so hard to grow up :P)

 

Place :  Jurong Bird Park, Singapore // Date : 16 January 2015 // Time of the day : Noon // Camera : Canon 600 D // Exposure time : 1/80 seconds // F-stop : f/5 // ISO : 6400 // Focal Length: 60 mm // Flash : No

 

The Cloud Forest Dome, Gardens by the bay... Some man-made wonders make you go aaaahhhh

The Cloud Forest Dome, Gardens by the bay… Some man-made wonders make you go aaaahhhh

 

Place :  Gardens by the bay, Singapore // Date : 16 January 2015 // Time of the day : Evening // Camera : Canon 600 D // Exposure time : 1/400 seconds // F-stop : f/8 // ISO : 1600 // Focal Length: 135 mm // Flash : No

 

At the light show in vertical garden pillars, Gardens by the bay...

At the light show, Vertical garden pillars, Gardens by the bay…

 

Place :  Gardens by the bay, Singapore // Date : 16 January 2015 // Time of the day : Night // Camera : Canon 600 D // Exposure time : 1/60 seconds // F-stop : f/5.6 // ISO : 6400 // Focal Length: 18 mm // Flash : No

When lights danced for music at Gardens by the bay

When lights danced for music at Gardens by the bay

 

Place :  Gardens by the bay, Singapore // Date : 16 January 2015 // Time of the day : Night // Camera : Canon 600 D // Exposure time : 1/60 seconds // F-stop : f/5.6 // ISO : 6400 // Focal Length: 18 mm // Flash : No

 

No photos from Universal Studios. Didn’t want to carry my Camera there. It was super cool and awesome fun. I would assure you on that.